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Alcohol Addiction: Part 2

Alcohol Addiction: Who Are The Real Victims?

People often feel sorry for, or angry with, alcoholics. These days, they are starting to realize that people close to the alcoholics are also damaged by their actions.

Alcohol addiction strikes at everyone around the alcoholic. Wives, husbands, partners; children, mothers, fathers; employers, employees, staff; and even random strangers who were just "in the wrong place" at the time.

Almost always, it is not the intention of the alcoholic to cause problems. The person addicted to alcohol often has feelings of despair, helplessness, self-loathing and fear. Sadly, they become wrapped up in their own misery and fail to notice the effects that they have on other people. Because of their dreadful introspection, alcoholics then enter a downward spiral, where they drink to forget or to cope with their unpleasant feelings, and the alcohol simply makes those feelings worse.

Eventually, the alcoholic believes himself or herself unable to cope without drinking.

Because of the addling effects that alcohol has on the brain, the alcoholic will start to blame circumstances and other people for his or her problems. It becomes a case of believing, "I'm not an alcoholic. I only drink because..." followed by some excuse. It stops the person from admitting the problem/

In order to learn how to stop drinking alcohol, the person will need plenty of support, from loved ones and friends, professional organizations, and therapists. However, none of this will help if the alcoholic has not first admitted without reservation to the problem.

The first step to helping the alcohol, then, is to get that person to admit to the problem. This is not easy. Each time you help, it becomes another excuse for the alcoholic. He may crave the attention that drinking gives (reinforcing the effects of self-pity); she may see the help as insufficient (no matter how unfair that may be). Unfortunately, many alcoholics admit their problems only after they have lost everything that is dear to them: Family, children, friends, job, house...

Once the alcoholic has admitted to the problem and agrees to seek help, then is the time to support. The alcoholic needs tools to learn how to stop drinking alcohol. In addition to the expert advice from organizations, there are books, hypnotherapy, complementary therapies, and retreats (some of them free).

The important thing to remember is that alcohol is a highly addictive drug, and so alcohol addiction (usually) needs more than one approach. Mixing together as many different approaches as possible, all working together, will give the greatest chance of success.

 

Alcohol Addiction: A Solution

With the increase of binge and underage drinking are we heading for problems of an epidemic scale? Is the fun and free living going to come back and haunt us in the not so distant future? Well it is certainly possible as diabetes, liver failure and so many other physical ailments can be helped along by bad drinking habits. So why are we experiencing problems like this in the twenty-first century – at the beginning of the information age – and more importantly, how can we change bad drinking habits or deal with alcoholism? Well let’s start by saying that binge drinking and alcoholism are two different subjects; however the first can lead quite easily into the latter.

There are some many reasons why more and more people today create bad habits of addictions around alcohol. It could be down to peer pressure, problems at home, depression or avoidance to name but a few. Drinking sometimes becomes a simply and easy escape for the drinker that just wants to feel different and maybe even just de-stress. At some point they usually start to realise that their answer is not in the bottom of a glass, however usually by this point the addiction has set in and taken its grip on its victim. Once the action has made itself at home it then just becomes so incredibly difficult for the sufferer to change the habit by themselves.

There are many ways for a person suffering at the hands of alcoholism to get the help that they so desperately need. In my clinic and trough my products I help people to beat their addiction with hypnosis and self hypnosis. I have found this to be a great approach as it deals with the part of your brain that we refer to as your sub-conscious mind. This is the part of your brain that holds all of the information about your habits, beliefs and the part that ultimately makes you… YOU! Hypnosis simply works to reprogram this part of your mind to get you the results that you both desire and deserve in an easy and straightforward way that is very empowering.

If you are suffering with an addiction to alcohol at the moment and would like to resolve it or just cut down, then my recommendation to you would be to start with a hypnosis download or maybe a self hypnosis book. If you are really serious about gaining control then start today! I wish you the best of luck and success.

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